Megan Krigbaum

Contributing Editor

Megan Krigbaum is a New York City-based wine and spirits writer and editor. For the past 10 years she has been a wine editor at Food & Wine magazine, navigating the masthead from editorial assistant to deputy wine editor. There, she wrote a monthly wine column called "Bottle Service," in addition to regular feature stories pertaining to wine, spirits and beer. She lives in Brooklyn with her husband Michael and their cat Mason.

Articles by

About Those Tom and Jerry Bowls

Though the Tom and Jerry’s popularity has waned, its namesake bowl and cups have given birth to an avid collector’s market. Megan Krigbaum on the cult of Tom and Jerry drinkware, past and present.

How the Leave-a-Drink Tradition Came to Be

The leave-a-drink tradition is spreading to bars across the country. Here, Megan Krigbaum tracks the evolution of the practice, from scrawled notes to bar blackboards to a host of new apps all meant to pay it forward.

Meet This Austrian Winery’s “Family of Wines”

One small producer in Austria is building a family tree out of its wines, assigning each a name, a portrait and a lineage—and striving to change how we think about a wine’s identity in the process. Megan Krigbaum on the Gut Oggau family of wines.

A Guide to the World’s Funkiest Ciders

Funky, tannic and acidic, traditional Spanish cider has seen a slow but notable evolution at home and here in the U.S., where a growing crop of American producers are making cider in the Spanish style. Megan Krigbaum on the history and culture of these ciders, plus six bottles to look for.

Where Did the Tiny Beer Come From?

Known as the “pony,” the seven-ounce bottle usually filled with commercial-grade beer has been appearing lately at bars both high and low. Megan Krigbaum on the origins—and wide-reaching, enduring appeal—of the tiny beer.

How Do You Make a Wine That Costs $3.50?

How does a $3.50 bottle of wine go from grape to store for so little? Megan Krigbaum investigates what actually goes into making such an inexpensive wine, and at what costs.

Should a Wine List Change Daily?

Over the past ten years, sommeliers have begun to favor smaller, seasonal lists. Some are taking it one step further, fashioning wine lists that change daily in an effort to better compliment the kitchen. Megan Krigbaum on the constantly changing list as a reflection of how we dine, and drink, today.

Can America Make Great Italian-Style Bitters?

As Negronis and spritzes boom in popularity, so too has the market for bitter Italian aperitivo liqueurs and amari, so much so that domestic distillers are producing their own versions. But how do they stack up against their more traditional counterparts?

A Guide to the Best American Amari and Aperitivi

Over the past few years, there’s been a mini-boom of American-made bitter liqueurs, which—despite being modeled after Italy’s famous amari and bitter aperitivi—are largely unique. Here, a guide to seven worth seeking out, the stories behind them and what they taste like.

Vermentino v. Pigato: Liguria’s Two White Wines Battle It Out

In Liguria, vermentino shares space with pigato, a grape that is essentially its freckled twin. But are they actually the same? Megan Krigbaum on the unexpected differences between the two, and whether they can be identified when paired head-to-head in a blind tasting.