glossary

Lowball

(n.) An umbrella term for any drink served in a lowball glass, otherwise known as an Old-Fashioned or rocks glass. This sweeping category encompasses cocktails served with ice or neat,…

glossary

Jigger

(n.) A bartending tool used to measure small quantities of liquid. In 19th-century recipes, this measurement was imprecise, but some speculate it correlated with either the pony glass or something…

glossary

Highball

1. (n.)  A spirit (most often whiskey) mixed with a carbonated beverage in a roughly 1:2 ratio and served in a tall glass over ice. Originally a whisky and soda…

glossary

Hard Shake

(v.) A highly choreographed and controversial version of the hand shake said to increase emulsification, texture and quality of ice chips that float on a shaken and poured cocktail. Developed…

glossary

Shake

(v.) A cocktail-making technique in which the ingredients are rapidly shaken by hand in a shaker before being strained into the service glass. Cocktails that include “cloudy” ingredients, such as…

glossary

Garnish

(n.) An object placed on or in a finished cocktail that performs a decorative function, though some may also add flavor. Many garnishes are built into traditional cocktail recipes; some…

glossary

Free Pour

(v.) A bartending skill in which the act of portioning a cocktail’s ingredients is done by pouring spirits straight from the bottle, rather than measuring with a jigger first. A…

glossary

Dry

(adj.) A drink order, usually in reference to the contemporary recipe for dry martinis, that specifies dry vermouth to be mixed with gin in a ratio of 1:5, or 6.

glossary

Double Strain

(v.) This cocktail-making technique for shaken drinks requires two strainers (usually a Hawthorne strainer and a fine-mesh strainer) for pouring the liquid from the shaker into the service glass. The…

glossary

Dash

(n.) An imprecise measurement used to indicate a very small amount of liquid, most often used in reference to liquids that are used sparingly, such as bitters or hot sauce.…